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Concrete regionalism / Catherine Slessor

By: Slessor, Catherine.
Series: 4 X 4 series. Publisher: New York : Thames & Hudson, 2000Description: 128 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0500282277.Subject(s): Andō, Tadao, 1941- -- Criticism and interpretation | Andō, Tadao, 1941- -- Criticism and interpretation | Arets, W. M. J. -- Criticism and interpretation | Legorreta Vilchis, Ricardo -- Criticism and interpretation | Predock, Antoine -- Criticism and interpretation | Architecture, Modern -- 20th century | Concrete construction | Concrete structures -- Design | Regionalism in architectureDDC classification: 724.7
Contents:
2.00 Introduction. - 2.10 Antoine Predock. - 2.20 Tadao Ando. - 2.30 Wiel Arets. - 2.40 Ricardo Legorreta. - 2.50 Architects' Information.
Summary: "Concrete regionalism draws upon indigenous wisdom, penetrating beyond the superficial features of regional style to explore a more resonant architecture rooted in immemorial responses to landscapes and climate. Concrete's structural strength and visual variety combined with the particulars of place and culture have allowed Tadao Ando (Osaka), Ricardo Legorreta (Mexico City), Antoine Predock (Albuquerque, USA) and Wiel Arets (The Netherlands) to realize progressive and seminal forms. The buildings of these four architects sensitively respond to their environments, while nevertheless functioning as monumental symbols that transcend their immediate surroundings. Although they have established large international practices, the approaches of the four architects have enabled them to forge an architectonic language that is both solid and meaningful. From Predock's sensitive interpretations of America's southwest desert to Ando's graceful intervention in natural and urban contexts, from Legorreta's bold representatives of Mexico's rich pre-Columbian heritage to Arets's cool "second-modernist' forms, each architect's highly individual vision has created unique buildings for people and their environments. In one sense the result of local conditions, the buildings in Concrete Regionalism also seems to exist out of time and place, constant reminders that there persists in architecture a search for enduring form." - Front cover flap.
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Notes Date due Barcode
Main Collection Taylor's Library-TU
724.7 SLE (Browse shelf) 1 Available SABDx,23003,02,CL 1000114553
Main Collection Taylor's Library-TU
724.7 SLE (Browse shelf) 1 Available SABDx,23003,02,CL 1000111705
Main Collection Taylor's Library-TU
724.7 SLE (Browse shelf) 1 Available SABDx,23003,02,CL 1000107896

"Antoine Predock, Tadao Ando, Wiel Arets, Ricardo Legorreta" - Cover.

"With 258 illustrations, 104 in colour" - T.p.

2.00 Introduction. - 2.10 Antoine Predock. - 2.20 Tadao Ando. - 2.30 Wiel Arets. - 2.40 Ricardo Legorreta. - 2.50 Architects' Information.

"Concrete regionalism draws upon indigenous wisdom, penetrating beyond the superficial features of regional style to explore a more resonant architecture rooted in immemorial responses to landscapes and climate. Concrete's structural strength and visual variety combined with the particulars of place and culture have allowed Tadao Ando (Osaka), Ricardo Legorreta (Mexico City), Antoine Predock (Albuquerque, USA) and Wiel Arets (The Netherlands) to realize progressive and seminal forms. The buildings of these four architects sensitively respond to their environments, while nevertheless functioning as monumental symbols that transcend their immediate surroundings. Although they have established large international practices, the approaches of the four architects have enabled them to forge an architectonic language that is both solid and meaningful. From Predock's sensitive interpretations of America's southwest desert to Ando's graceful intervention in natural and urban contexts, from Legorreta's bold representatives of Mexico's rich pre-Columbian heritage to Arets's cool "second-modernist' forms, each architect's highly individual vision has created unique buildings for people and their environments. In one sense the result of local conditions, the buildings in Concrete Regionalism also seems to exist out of time and place, constant reminders that there persists in architecture a search for enduring form." - Front cover flap.